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dc.contributor.authorRemus, Britten Graceen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:31:03Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:31:03Z
dc.date.issued2001-11-27en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-01242002-225721en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/31033
dc.description.abstractForty-two college aged participants took part in a mixed repeated measures factorial design experiment that assessed color memory as a function of condition (practice with feedback, practice without feedback and no practice), dimension (hue, saturation and lightness) and color (red, yellow, green and blue). Attention was focused on the distinction between memory color and color memory, color experience and preference, mechanisms of color perception and theories of color vision (see below). Only two significant effects were found: a significant main effect for dimension and a significant interaction between dimension and color. Pearson correlations were assessed between color memory and color experience, color preference and observer imagery. None of the correlations were significant. The results of the experiments revealed that practice does not have a significant effect on color memory and the conclusion, therefore, is that the phenomenon of color memory is not improved by practice. A tentative explanation involves the early stages of color processing which are presumed to be computational in nature and to take place independently of cognitive processes such as learning and memory, which do not take place until visual information has reached the extrastriate areas. By that time, color information has been combined with information about context, in area V4 of the human visual cortex (Zeki & Marini, 1998). Although it has been shown through this experiment that practice does not improve memory for color, the possibility remains that practice may improve memory color for specific objects - namely ecologically relevant stimuli - since memory color involves higher order processing, such as learning and memory.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartthesis.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectcolor preferenceen_US
dc.subjectmemory coloren_US
dc.subjectpracticeen_US
dc.subjectcolor memoryen_US
dc.subjectRetinex Theoryen_US
dc.titleAn Investigation of the Effects of Practice on Color Memory as a Function of Condition, Dimension and Coloren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairPrestrude, Albert M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCrawford, Helen J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBell, Martha Annen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-01242002-225721/en_US
dc.date.sdate2002-01-24en_US
dc.date.rdate2003-02-26
dc.date.adate2002-02-26en_US


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