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dc.contributor.authorOrozco-Mendoza, Elva Fabiolaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:35:20Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:35:20Z
dc.date.issued2008-04-24en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05062008-175949en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32268
dc.description.abstractThis study is dedicated to examine the concept of borders, geographical and otherwise, as instruments that are socially produced. It utilizes Gloria Anzalduaâ s theoretical framework of Borderlands theory as a set of processes that seek to attain the de-colonization of the inner self. The historical and spatial dynamics of the geographical border between Mexico and United States, largely shaped by the U.S. expansionist agenda, resulted in the Mexican lost of more than half of its territory and the subsequent stigmatization of Mexican-Americans/Chicanos as â foreign others,â since they did not share with predominant Anglo-Saxons the same values, culture, religion, traditions and skin color. I argue that the later exploitation, exclusion, marginalization, and racism against Mexican-Americans/Chicanos informed Anzalduaâ s development of her Borderlands theory that seeks to attain liberation for any colonized identity. However, it is also my argument that the borderlands theory fails to account for meaningful political freedom since the processes that compose the theory are principally worked at the inner level, restricting the possibilities for a direct confrontation in the public sphere.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartFinal_thesis_corrected.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectPoliticsen_US
dc.subjectMestizaen_US
dc.subjectGloria Anzaldúaen_US
dc.subjectBordersen_US
dc.subjectBorderlands Theoryen_US
dc.subjectChicana/oen_US
dc.subjectFreedomen_US
dc.subjectPostcolonial Theory U.S.-Mexico waren_US
dc.titleBorderlands Theory: Producing Border Epistemologies with Gloria Anzalduaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Scienceen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairNatter, Wolfgang Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVazquez-Arroyo, Antonio Y.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, Barbara Ellenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShingles, Richard D.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05062008-175949/en_US
dc.date.sdate2008-05-06en_US
dc.date.rdate2008-05-27
dc.date.adate2008-05-27en_US


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