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dc.contributor.authorWest, Laura Elizabethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T20:35:43Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T20:35:43Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-25en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05082012-115854en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/32399
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the notion of "black modernity" in the context of the Liberia at the turn of the twentieth century. Despite Liberia's recognition by the international community as a sovereign nation, Liberia fell subject to the imperial ploys of the European powers in the Scramble for Africa. Americo-Liberians, the governing elite of Liberia, toiled to preserve Liberia's status as an autonomous nation and the only self-governed black republic in Africa. This thesis examines the complexities of Liberia's sovereignty crisis, highlighting the ways in which Americo-Liberians used methods of "modernity" for their own purposes. Using Liberia as a case study, this thesis argues that the concept of "black modernity" hinges on contextual factors such as the plight of the people, pending circumstances, power structures, and understanding of self in relation to these variables. Americo-Liberians, unlike most black people at this time, were protected from race-based oppression by the state. Thus, when Liberia's sovereignty was in jeopardy, Americo-Liberians diligently fought to ensure that the Republic of Liberia maintained its sovereignty by using methods of colonialism and diplomacy. While these methods mirrored those of the European imperialists, Americo-Liberians employed these methods to preserve Liberia and, accordingly, challenge the prevailing notions of black inferiority.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartWest_LE_T_2012en_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectidentityen_US
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.subjectimperialismen_US
dc.subjectBlack Modernityen_US
dc.subjectLiberiaen_US
dc.title"The Negro Experiment": Black Modernity and Liberia, 1883-1910en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairHeaton, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShadle, Brett L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHidalgo, Dennis R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMollin, Marian B.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05082012-115854/en_US
dc.date.sdate2012-05-08en_US
dc.date.rdate2012-05-25
dc.date.adate2012-05-25en_US


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