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dc.contributor.authorWebb, Jared A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:29:41Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:29:41Z
dc.date.issued2006-02-07en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-02152006-140516en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/41131
dc.description.abstractThe Blue Plains Wastewater Treatment Plant in Washington, D.C. is in the process of updating its anaerobic digesters, with a completion date set for 2008. This research was undertaken to aid designers at Blue Plains by evaluating alternative digestion approaches. The technologies applicable to the plant included thermophilic anaerobic digestion, acid/gas phased digestion, and temperature phased anaerobic digestion. To obtain design data, a year long study was conducted using bench scale digestion systems operating at different solids retention times (SRT) and organic loading rates (OLR). The digesters were fed with mixed primary and secondary waste (50/50 by weight) from the Blue Plains wastewater treatment facility. The digesters were operated until they reached steady state as observed by volatile solids reduction (VSR), methane production, and volatile fatty acid (VFA) levels. At this point, samples of digested waste sludge were analyzed for residual biological activity, dewatering properties and headspace organo-sulfur production. Results from the study demonstrated that the TPAD digestion process had the lowest residual biological activity (RBA) after digestion, and that the single stage thermophilic digesters had the highest RBA. Sludge from single stage mesophilic digestion had the highest odor potential, with headspace gas tests generating over 1400 mg organo-sulfur per m3 of headspace gas, while both single stage thermophilic and TPAD systems generated less than 400 mg/m3 at all SRTs studied.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartWebb_2006_etd2.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectbiosolidsen_US
dc.subjectorganosulfuren_US
dc.subjectanaerobicen_US
dc.subjectdigestionen_US
dc.subjectsludgeen_US
dc.subjectshearen_US
dc.titleA Comparative Study of Anaerobic Digestion Processes for Sewage Sludgeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Planningen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairNovak, John T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBoardman, Gregory D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRandall, Clifford W.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-02152006-140516/en_US
dc.date.sdate2006-02-15en_US
dc.date.rdate2008-02-24
dc.date.adate2006-02-24en_US


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