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dc.contributor.authorWu, Qiongen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:30:21Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:30:21Z
dc.date.issued2011-02-10en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-02242011-140939en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/41287
dc.description.abstractSeveral studies have found that adult caretakers usually hyperarticulate to infants by modifying their voice in ways that promote and sustain infantsâ attention. This articulation when engaging in infant directed speech (IDS) can result in â clear speechâ by the expansion of the vowel space area. The degree of speech clarity produced by caregivers appears to provide advantages for young language learners to promote lexical perception and learning. However few studies have ever examined whether infants are able to perceive the difference between hyperarticulation and normal speech. In this study, 7-to 12-month-oldsâ (n=17) speech discrimination when hearing hyperarticulated and non-hyperarticulated words in mothersâ natural speech production was examined. The degree of speech clarity was determined by the relations of the first (F1) and second formant frequencies (F2) of the vowel. The result showed that there was no discrimination between listening to hyperarticulated and non-hyperarticulated words, indicating that the benefit accrued by exposure to clear speech may require no selective attention on the part of the infant. Thus the advantages of hyperarticulation might be related to other characteristics.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartWu_Q_T_2011_IRB.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartWu_Q_T_2011.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjecthyperarticulated speechen_US
dc.subjectdiscriminationen_US
dc.subjectattentionen_US
dc.subjectInfantsen_US
dc.titleDo Infants Discriminate Hyper-from Non-Hyperarticulated Speech?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairCooper, Robin K. Pannetonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFriedman, Bruce H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFritz, Matthewen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-02242011-140939/en_US
dc.date.sdate2011-02-24en_US
dc.date.rdate2011-03-16
dc.date.adate2011-03-16en_US


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