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dc.contributor.authorDeaton, Juan D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:34:15Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:34:15Z
dc.date.issued2010-05-04en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-04202010-202823en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/42165
dc.description.abstractThis thesis provides three main contributions with respect to the Dynamic Channel and Power Assignment (DCPA) problem. DCPA refers to the allocation of transmit power and frequency channels to links in a cognitive dynamic spectrum network so as to maximize the total number of feasible links while minimizing the aggregate transmit power. In order to provide a method to compare related, yet disparate, work, the first contribution of this thesis is a unifying optimization formulation to describe the DCPA problem. This optimization problem is based on maximizing the number of feasible links and minimizing transmit power of a set of communications links in a given communications network. Using this optimization formulation, this thesis develops its second contribution: a evaluation method for comparing DCPA algorithms. The evaluation method is applied to five DPCA algorithms representative of the DCPA literature . These five algorithms are selected to illustrate the tradeoffs between control modes (centralized versus distributed) and channel/power assignment techniques. Initial algorithm comparisons are done by analyzing channel and power assignment techniques and algorithmic complexity of five different DCPA algorithms. Through simulations, algorithm performance is evaluated by the metrics of feasibility ratio and average power per link. Results show that the centralized algorithm Minimum Power Increase Assignment (MPIA) has the overall best feasibility ratio and the lowest average power per link of the five algorithms we investigated. Through assignment by the least change in transmit power, MPIA minimizes interference and increases the number of feasible links. However, implementation of this algorithm requires calculating the inverse of near singular matrices, which could lead to inaccurate results. The third contribution of this thesis is a proposed distributed channel assignment algorithm, Least Interfering Channel and Iterative Power Assignment (LICIPA). This distributed algorithm has the best feasibility ratio and lowest average power per link of the distributed algorithms. In some cases, LICIPA achieves 90% of the feasibility ratio of MPIA, while having lower complexity and overall lower average run time.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartDeaton_JD_T_2010.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectMobile Adhoc Networksen_US
dc.subjectDynamic Channel and Power Assignmenten_US
dc.subjectCognitive Networksen_US
dc.subjectDynamic Spectrum Accessen_US
dc.titleEvaluation of Dynamic Channel and Power Assignment Techniques for Cognitive Dynamic Spectrum Access Networksen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairDaSilva, Luiz A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMacKenzie, Allen B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReed, Jeffrey Hughen_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-04202010-202823/en_US
dc.date.sdate2010-04-20en_US
dc.date.rdate2010-07-08
dc.date.adate2010-07-08en_US


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