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dc.contributor.authorSkelley, Chelsea Atkinsen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:35:25Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:35:25Z
dc.date.issued2011-04-26en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05022011-123707en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/42432
dc.description.abstractI argue that to understand the gender dynamics of New Orleans, Hurricane Katrina, and the stormâ s aftermath, one must interrogate the cultural conflation of the black female body and the cityâ s legacy to explore what it means and how it situates real black women in social, cultural, and physical landscapes. Using a hybrid theoretical framework informed by Black feminist theory, ecocriticism, critical race feminism, and post-positivist realism, I explore the connections between New Orleansâ cultural and historical discourses that gender the city as feminine, more specifically as a black woman or Jezebel, with narratives of real black females to illustrate the impact that dominant discourses have on peopleâ s lives. I ground this work in Black feminism, specifically Hortense Spillersâ s and Patricia Hill Collinsâ s works that center the black female body to garner a fuller understanding of social systems, Kimberlé Crenshawâ s concept of intersectionality, and Evelyn Hammondsâ s call for a reclamation of the body to interrogate the ideologies that inscribe black women. In addition, I argue that black women should reclaim New Orleansâ metaphorical black body and interrogate this history to move forward in rebuilding the city. As an ecocritic and feminist, I understand the tension involved with reading a city as feminine and arguing for this reclamation, as this echoes colonial and imperialist discourses of conquering land and bodies, but I negotiate these tensions by specifically examining the discourse itself to expose the sexist and racist ideologies at work.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartSkelley_CA_T_2011.pdfen_US
dc.relation.haspartSkelley_CA_IRBapproval.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectgothicen_US
dc.subjectblack female bodyen_US
dc.subjectJezebelen_US
dc.subjectHurricane Katrinaen_US
dc.subjectNew Orleansen_US
dc.subjectgenderen_US
dc.titleRe-visioning Katrina: Exploring Gender in pre- and post-Katrina New Orleansen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnglishen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairSalaita, Steven G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPowell, Katrina M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChandler, Gena E.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05022011-123707/en_US
dc.date.sdate2011-05-02en_US
dc.date.rdate2011-05-26
dc.date.adate2011-05-26en_US


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