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dc.contributor.authorGutierrez, Gerald Andrewen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-14T21:36:55Z
dc.date.available2014-03-14T21:36:55Z
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-06052007-163152en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/42861
dc.description.abstractThroughout history, and even today, it appears that architecture is obligated to develop its principles from nature, purely on the fact that nature "came into the world" first. Thus, by following these principles, architecture is supposedly justified because it adheres to the natural order of the universe. However, in traversing the historic processes of art, the legitimacy of nature as a prescriptive model is thrown into doubt when such a model becomes elusive and indeterminate. It is the purpose of this book to show that rather than seek universal harmony by imitating that which occurs in nature, architecture actually demonstrates the human desire to harness and cultivate the natural environment, thereby embracing the primal conflict between nature art. By acknowledging this dialectical relationship, the book chooses to stay clear of delving into any existential thought derived from this conflict's more romantic notions; it also wishes to avoid any random speculations about issue that has been debated and interpreted centuries. Instead, by recognizing the specific epistemological value inherent in this opposition, it hopes to establish useful and tangible criteria for making aesthetic decisions in any architectural project.en_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartLD5655.V855_1988.G885.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectVirginiaen_US
dc.subjectwineryen_US
dc.subject.lccLD5655.V855 1988.G885en_US
dc.titleTracing the Elusive Archetype: The Design of the Central Virginian Wineryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentArchitectureen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRott, Hans Christianen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDunay, Robert J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFerrari, Olivio C.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-06052007-163152/en_US
dc.date.sdate2007-06-05en_US
dc.date.rdate2007-06-05
dc.date.adate2007-06-05en_US


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