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dc.contributor.authorBacim de Araujo e Silva, Felipeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-28T13:52:05Z
dc.date.available2015-09-28T13:52:05Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-21en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:6043en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/56658
dc.description.abstractAlthough many selection techniques have been proposed and developed over the years, selection by pointing is perhaps the most popular approach for selection. In 3D interfaces, the laser-pointer metaphor is commonly used, since users only have to point to their target from a distance. However, the task of selecting objects that have a small visible area or that are in highly cluttered environments is hard when using pointing techniques. With both indirect and direct pointing techniques in 3D interfaces, smaller targets require higher levels of pointing precision from the user. In addition, issues such as target occlusion as well as hand and tracker jitter negatively affect user performance. Therefore, requiring the user to perform selection in a single precise step may result in users spending more time to select targets so that they can be more accurate (effect known as the speed-accuracy trade-off). We describe an approach to address this issue, called Progressive Refinement. Instead of performing a single precise selection, users gradually reduce the set of selectable objects to reduce the required precision of the task. This approach, however, has an inherent trade-off when compared to immediate selection techniques. Progressive refinement requires a gradual process of selection, often using multiple steps, although each step can be fast, accurate, and nearly effortless. Immediate techniques, on the other hand, involve a single-step selection that requires effort and may be slower and more error-prone. Therefore, the goal of this work was to explore this trade-off. The research includes the design and evaluation of progressive refinement techniques for 3D interfaces, using both pointing- and gesture-based interfaces for single-object selection and volume selection. Our technique designs and other existing selection techniques that can be classified as progressive refinement were used to create a design space. We designed eight progressive refinement techniques and compared them to the most commonly used techniques (for a baseline comparison) and to other state-of-the-art selection techniques in a total of four empirical studies. Based on the results of the studies, we developed a set of design guidelines that will help other researchers design and use progressive refinement techniques.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subject3D selectionen_US
dc.subject3D user interfacesen_US
dc.subjectprogressive refinementen_US
dc.titleIncreasing Selection Accuracy and Speed through Progressive Refinementen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentComputer Scienceen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComputer Science and Applicationsen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairBowman, Douglas Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNorth, Christopher L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBalakrishnan, Ravinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCao, Yongen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPolys, Nicholas Fearingen_US


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