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dc.contributor.authorFranke, Morgan Elizabethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-12T19:10:36Z
dc.date.available2016-12-12T19:10:36Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-11en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:8144en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/73660
dc.description.abstractMining has caused ecosystem losses worldwide, with surface mining disturbing >2.4 million hectares in the United States since 1930. The Appalachian region of the US is home to extensive temperate deciduous forests that provide many ecosystem services and economic benefits. However, >400,000 hectares of forest have been lost due to surface coal mining, with most not being restored back to native forests or other productive land uses. These areas are left fragmented, heavily modified, unmanaged, and densely invaded by non-native plants. Autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) is one of the most prevalent invasive species on reclaimed mines in Appalachia and viewed as one of the main hindrances to the successful reclamation of mined land to restore native forests. In order to better assess the impact autumn olive can have on reclamation success, we characterize autumn olive's performance in various reclamation scenarios and also how the management of autumn olive affects hardwood tree establishment. We review how exotic species impact restoration outcomes, and advocate for a better understanding of how these species could contribute towards a more ecological understanding of reclamation. Reclamation goals are currently assessed after 5 years, prioritizing short-term goals (e.g. erosion control) instead of longer-term goals such as the return of ecosystem function. With a better understanding of plant function and ecological processes, we hope to continue to advance successful reclamation on surface mined lands.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectAppalachiaen_US
dc.subjectautumn oliveen_US
dc.subjectbiological invasionsen_US
dc.subjectdisturbanceen_US
dc.subjectexoticen_US
dc.subjectForestry Reclamation Approachen_US
dc.subjectnovel ecosystemen_US
dc.subjectnutrient cyclingen_US
dc.subjectreclamationen_US
dc.subjectrestorationen_US
dc.subjectSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Acten_US
dc.subjectsuccessionen_US
dc.titleUnderstanding Invasive Species Impacts on Reclaimed Surface-Mined Landsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Scienceen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Science in Life Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science in Life Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairBarney, Jacoben_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZipper, Carl E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWalters, Jeffrey R.en_US


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