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dc.contributor.authorXia, Aien
dc.contributor.authorSharakhova, Maria V.en
dc.contributor.authorLeman, Scotland C.en
dc.contributor.authorTu, Zhijianen
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Jeffrey A.en
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Christopher D.en
dc.contributor.authorSharakhov, Igor V.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-05T22:16:27Zen
dc.date.available2017-01-05T22:16:27Zen
dc.date.issued2010-05-12en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/73962en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Nonrandom distribution of rearrangements is a common feature of eukaryotic chromosomes that is not well understood in terms of genome organization and evolution. In the major African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, polymorphic inversions are highly nonuniformly distributed among five chromosomal arms and are associated with epidemiologically important adaptations. However, it is not clear whether the genomic content of the chromosomal arms is associated with inversion polymorphism and fixation rates. Methodology/Principal Findings: To better understand the evolutionary dynamics of chromosomal inversions, we created a physical map for an Asian malaria mosquito, Anopheles stephensi, and compared it with the genome of An. gambiae. We also developed and deployed novel Bayesian statistical models to analyze genome landscapes in individual chromosomal arms An. gambiae. Here, we demonstrate that, despite the paucity of inversion polymorphisms on the X chromosome, this chromosome has the fastest rate of inversion fixation and the highest density of transposable elements, simple DNA repeats, and GC content. The highly polymorphic and rapidly evolving autosomal 2R arm had overrepresentation of genes involved in cellular response to stress supporting the role of natural selection in maintaining adaptive polymorphic inversions. In addition, the 2R arm had the highest density of regions involved in segmental duplications that clustered in the breakpoint-rich zone of the arm. In contrast, the slower evolving 2L, 3R, and 3L, arms were enriched with matrixattachment regions that potentially contribute to chromosome stability in the cell nucleus. Conclusions/Significance: These results highlight fundamental differences in evolutionary dynamics of the sex chromosome and autosomes and revealed the strong association between characteristics of the genome landscape and rates of chromosomal evolution. We conclude that a unique combination of various classes of genes and repetitive DNA in each arm, rather than a single type of repetitive element, is likely responsible for arm-specific rates of rearrangements.en
dc.format.extent? - ? (13) page(s)en
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherPLOSen
dc.relation.urihttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000277563400006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=930d57c9ac61a043676db62af60056c1en
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectMultidisciplinary Sciencesen
dc.subjectScience & Technology - Other Topicsen
dc.subjectMULTIDISCIPLINARY SCIENCESen
dc.subjectVECTOR ANOPHELES-FUNESTUSen
dc.subjectTRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTen
dc.subjectDROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTERen
dc.subjectSEGMENTAL DUPLICATIONSen
dc.subjectGAMBIAE COMPLEXen
dc.subjectSPECIES COMPLEXen
dc.subjectNUCLEAR LAMINSen
dc.subjectGENE ONTOLOGYen
dc.subjectINVERSION 2LAen
dc.subjectSPECIATIONen
dc.titleGenome Landscape and Evolutionary Plasticity of Chromosomes in Malaria Mosquitoesen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.description.versionPublished (Publication status)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiochemistryen
dc.contributor.departmentEntomologyen
dc.contributor.departmentStatisticsen
dc.title.serialPLOS ONEen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0010592en
dc.identifier.volume5en
dc.identifier.issue5en
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Techen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/Biochemistryen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/CALS T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/Entomologyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Faculty of Health Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Scienceen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Science/COS T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Science/Statisticsen


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International