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dc.contributor.authorOliphant, Adam J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-22T07:00:45Z
dc.date.available2017-02-22T07:00:45Z
dc.date.issued2015-08-31en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:5473en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/75119
dc.description.abstractInvasive plant species threaten native plant communities and inhibit efforts to restore disturbed landscapes. Surface coal mines in the Appalachian Mountains are some of the most disturbed landscapes in North America. Moreover, there is not a comprehensive understanding of the land cover characteristics of post- mined lands in Appalachia. Better information on mined lands' vegetative cover and ecosystem recovery status is necessary for implementation of effective environmental management practices. The invasive autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) is abundant on former coal surface mines, often outcompeting native trees due to its faster growth rate. The frequent revisit time and spatial and spectral resolution of Landsat satellites make Landsat imagery well suited for mapping and characterizing land cover and forest recovery on former coal surface mines. I performed a multitemporal classification using a random forest analysis to map autumn olive on former and current surface coal mines in southwest Virginia. Imagery from the Operational Land Imager on Landsat 8 were used as input data for the study. Calibration and validation data for use in model development were obtained using high-resolution aerial imagery. Results indicate that autumn olive cover is sufficiently dense to enable detection using Landsat imagery on approximately 12.6% of the current and former surface coal mines located in the study area that have been mined since the early 1980s. The classified map produced here had a user's and producer's accuracy of 85.3% and 78.6% respectively for the autumn olive coverage class. Overall accuracy in reference to an independent validation dataset was 96.8%. These results indicate that autumn olive growing on reclaimed coal mines in Virginia and elsewhere in the Appalachian coalfields can be mapped using Landsat imagery. Additionally, autumn olive occurrence is a significant landscape feature on former surface coal mines in the Virginia coalfields.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectAfforestationen_US
dc.subjectEcosystem Recoveryen_US
dc.subjectLandsaten_US
dc.subjectLand Cover Changeen_US
dc.subjectAlien Plantsen_US
dc.subjectExotic Plantsen_US
dc.subjectInvasive Plantsen_US
dc.titleMapping Elaeagnus Umbellata on Coal Surface Mines using Multitemporal Landsat Imageryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentForest Resources and Environmental Conservationen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineForestryen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairWynne, Randolph H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeechairZipper, Carl E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFord, William Marken_US


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