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dc.contributor.authorWen, Keen_US
dc.contributor.authorTin, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Haifengen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Xingdongen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Guohuaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGiri-Rachman, Ernawatien_US
dc.contributor.authorKocher, Jacoben_US
dc.contributor.authorBui, Tammyen_US
dc.contributor.authorClark-Deener, Sherrieen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Lijuanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-22T15:01:49Z
dc.date.available2017-02-22T15:01:49Z
dc.date.issued2014-04-10en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/75122
dc.description.abstractThis study aims to establish a human gut microbiota (HGM) transplanted gnotobiotic (Gn) pig model of human rotavirus (HRV) infection and diarrhea, and to verify the dose-effects of probiotics on HRV vaccine-induced immune responses. Our previous studies using the Gn pig model found that probiotics dose-dependently regulated both T cell and B cell immune responses induced by rotavirus vaccines. We generated the HGM transplanted neonatal Gn pigs through daily feeding of neonatal human fecal suspension to germ-free pigs for 3 days starting at 12 hours after birth. We found that attenuated HRV (AttHRV) vaccination conferred similar overall protection against rotavirus diarrhea and virus shedding in Gn pigs and HGM transplanted Gn pigs. HGM promoted the development of the neonatal immune system, as evidenced by the significantly enhanced IFN-c producing T cell responses and reduction of regulatory T cells and their cytokine production in the AttHRV-vaccinated pigs. The higher dose Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) feeding (14 doses, up to 109 colonyforming-unit [CFU]/dose) effectively increased the LGG counts in the HGM Gn pig intestinal contents and significantly enhanced HRV-specific IFN-c producing T cell responses to the AttHRV vaccine. Lower dose LGG (9 doses, up to 106 CFU/dose) was ineffective. Neither doses of LGG significantly improved the protection rate, HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody titers in serum, or IgA antibody titers in intestinal contents compared to the AttHRV vaccine alone, suggesting that an even higher dose of LGG is needed to overcome the influence of the microbiota to achieve the immunostimulatory effect in the HGM pigs. This study demonstrated that HGM Gn pig is an applicable animal model for studying immune responses to rotavirus vaccines and can be used for studying interventions (i.e., probiotics and prebiotics) that may enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of vaccines through improving the gut microbiotaen_US
dc.format.extent? - ? (10) page(s)en_US
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.publisherPLOSen_US
dc.relation.urihttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000336909100085&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=930d57c9ac61a043676db62af60056c1en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectMultidisciplinary Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectScience & Technology - Other Topicsen_US
dc.subjectMULTIDISCIPLINARY SCIENCESen_US
dc.subjectHUMAN ROTAVIRUS INFECTIONen_US
dc.subjectFLORA-ASSOCIATED PIGLETSen_US
dc.subjectWA HUMAN ROTAVIRUSen_US
dc.subjectGERM-FREEen_US
dc.subjectPROTECTIVE IMMUNITYen_US
dc.subjectVACCINEen_US
dc.subjectBACTERIAen_US
dc.subjectDIARRHEAen_US
dc.subjectDISEASEen_US
dc.subjectIMMUNOGENICITYen_US
dc.titleProbiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Enhanced Th1 Cellular Immunity but Did Not Affect Antibody Responses in a Human Gut Microbiota Transplanted Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pig Modelen_US
dc.typeArticle - Refereed
dc.description.versionPublished (Publication status)en_US
dc.title.serialPLOS ONEen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0094504
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.orcidClark-Deener, S [0000-0002-6620-0625]en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Faculty
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Faculty of Health Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicine
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicine/Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicine/CVM T&R Faculty
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicine/Large Animal Clinical Sciences


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)