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dc.contributor.authorWhite, Bradley A.en
dc.contributor.authorJarrett, Matthew A.en
dc.contributor.authorOllendick, Thomas H.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-12T22:12:36Zen
dc.date.available2017-06-12T22:12:36Zen
dc.date.issued2013-03-01en
dc.identifier.issn0882-2689en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/78026en
dc.description.abstractChildhood aggression is often associated with significant psychosocial maladjustment; however, adjustment difficulties may vary based on the function of aggression. The present study used the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF; Gioia, Isquith, Guy, & Kenworthy, 2000) to examine whether difficulties in particular domains of self-regulation serve as common mechanisms in the association between reactive (versus proactive) aggression and internalizing or externalizing adjustment problems in clinic-referred children. Reactive aggression was associated with poorer behavioral regulation and metacognition, whereas proactive aggression was not associated with poorer self-regulation. Further, the association between reactive aggression and adjustment problems, both internalizing and externalizing, was accounted for by poorer behavioral regulation and metacognitive skills. Gender, age, ADHD diagnosis, IQ, and psychotropic medication status did not account for the results. These findings suggest that self-regulation skills influence adjustment problems in reactively aggressive youth and may be important targets of intervention for such children.en
dc.format.extent1 - 9 (9) page(s)en
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherSpringer/Plenum Publishersen
dc.relation.urihttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000314776100001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=930d57c9ac61a043676db62af60056c1en
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinicalen
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.subjectSelf-regulationen
dc.subjectAggressionen
dc.subjectExternalizingen
dc.subjectInternalizingen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDERen
dc.subjectPROACTIVE AGGRESSIONen
dc.subjectEXECUTIVE FUNCTIONSen
dc.subjectINFORMANT AGREEMENTen
dc.subjectRATING INVENTORYen
dc.subjectWORKING-MEMORYen
dc.subjectPEER STATUSen
dc.subjectADOLESCENTSen
dc.subjectCOMORBIDITYen
dc.subjectCHILDHOODen
dc.titleSelf-Regulation Deficits Explain the Link between Reactive Aggression and Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior Problems in Childrenen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.description.versionPublished (Publication status)en
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen
dc.title.serialJOURNAL OF PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND BEHAVIORAL ASSESSMENTen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10862-012-9310-9en
dc.identifier.volume35en
dc.identifier.issue1en
dc.identifier.orcidWhite, BA [0000-0002-7477-9956]en
dc.identifier.orcidOllendick, TH [0000-0003-3507-0300]en
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Techen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Scienceen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Science/COS T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Science/Psychologyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Distinguished Professorsen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes/Fralin Life Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes/Fralin Life Sciences/Fralin Affiliated Facultyen


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