Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMosley, Evan Christopheren_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-30T08:01:09Z
dc.date.available2018-06-30T08:01:09Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-29en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:15987en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/83809
dc.description.abstractReducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) is a global carbon trading program intent on mitigating or reversing carbon emissions from forestry in the global south. REDD+ was negotiated at the 2005 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and is coordinated by the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF), administered by the World Bank Group. In this project, I explore REDD+ activity in Costa Rica, drawing on Michel Foucault's concept of governmentality. Costa Rica became a participant in the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility in July of 2008. Since then, indigenous peoples throughout the country have contested the program. This project is a single-case study of the Bribri contestation of REDD+ schemes, one of the larger indigenous communities in Costa Rica. Bribri argue that REDD+ disrespects their worldview and further endangers their local rights to land and forestry. This project argues that REDD+ and Bribri have different perceptions of nature, enabling disagreement on REDD+ goals. Whereas REDD+ perceives nature as commodifiable for the purposes of neoliberal climate policies, Bribri express a spiritual, harmonious relationship with nature. I conclude by noting that REDD+ can pose negative implications for indigenous life and culture. This is not only because REDD+ draws external and domestic actors to land and forestry for incentive-based purposes. But also because REDD+ defines 'rightful behavior' among forestry resources, challenging indigenous conceptions of environmental management. However, the Bribri are resisting REDD+ imposition and, particularly, the program's external governing of indigenous behavior amongst forests.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectREDD+en_US
dc.subjectCosta Ricaen_US
dc.subjectsustainable developmenten_US
dc.subjectindigenous land rightsen_US
dc.subjectgovernmentalityen_US
dc.subjectdiscourse analysisen_US
dc.subjectPayment for Ecosystem Servicesen_US
dc.titleThe Commodification of Nature: Power/Knowledge and REDD+ in Costa Ricaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Scienceen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairScerri, Andrew Josephen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZanotti, Lauraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDixit, Priyaen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record