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dc.contributor.authorMozhi, Dimple Anekaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-03T08:00:49Z
dc.date.available2018-07-03T08:00:49Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-02en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:16589en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/83842
dc.description.abstractBackground: Dietary and serum antioxidants and physical activity can effect inflammation, which is associated with breast cancer risk and recurrence. This study investigated the relationship between diet, serum antioxidant capacity, physical activity, and inflammation in breast cancer survivors and individuals without cancer. Methods: Existing demographic, dietary intake, and physical activity data of 78 breast cancer survivors and 30 individuals without cancer from the Day and Night Study conducted at Virginia Commonwealth University were used. Participants were recruited from southern Virginia. Metabolic equivalents were calculated through type, intensity, and duration of physical activity. Dietary antioxidant intake (FRAP) was calculated from Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire data. Serum samples were analyzed for inflammation (hsCRP,IL-6,IL-1,and TNF alpha) and serum antioxidant capacity (ORAC) at Virginia Tech. Results: Anthropometrics and inflammation were higher, and FRAP and ORAC lower in breast cancer survivors compared to individuals without cancer, although not significant. There was a significant direct relationship between FRAP and ORAC and inverse relationship between FRAP and hsCRP. Breast cancer survivors 6+ years since diagnosis showed significant direct FRAP and IL-1 association, and inverse ORAC and TNF-alpha association. BMI was directly associated with IL-6 and CRP. Inflammation was not associated with METs or weekly activity, although there was an increasing inverse relation between METs, IL-1 and TNF- α with increasing ORAC. Conclusion: There is a significant relationship between dietary antioxidant intake and serum antioxidant capacity and inflammation. Increased body mass index increases inflammation. Diets high in antioxidants and maintaining a healthy weight may help reduce inflammation in breast cancer survivors.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectBreast canceren_US
dc.subjectdieten_US
dc.subjectantioxidantsen_US
dc.subjectphysical activityen_US
dc.subjectinflammationen_US
dc.titleRelationship of dietary antioxidant intake, antioxidant serum capacity, physical activity and inflammation in breast cancer survivors and individuals without a history of cancer.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHuman Nutrition, Foods, and Exerciseen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHuman Nutrition, Foods, and Exerciseen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairRafie, Carlinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJu, Young Hwaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchmelz, Eva Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVan Mullekom, Jenniferen_US


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