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dc.contributor.authorEsson, Patrice L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-06T16:01:39Z
dc.date.available2011-08-06T16:01:39Z
dc.date.issued2004-05-21en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05122004-205454en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/9959
dc.description.abstractWith the demographic layout of the workplace changing constantly, as more women enter the workforce, and as new organizational hiring practices lead to more diversity in the work environment, both researchers and employers have become increasingly interested in understanding the consequences of work-family conflict. Work-family conflict affects the individuals suffering from it, their families, and their employers. Thus, it is important to have a robust and comprehensive causal model that explains how these consequences arise so as to help all parties involved to prevent these consequences. The purpose of the present study was to test a comprehensive model of work-family conflict by examining the work, non-work and stress related consequences of work-family conflict using a sample of 181 Jamaican High School teachers. The results indicated that all hypothesized correlations but one were significant and in the direction predicted. However, the proposed model did not demonstrate good fit with the data. Post hoc revisions to the original model provided support for some of the initial hypotheses, thereby suggesting that work family conflict did predict job and life stress, among others. Overall, these findings indicate that work-family conflict results in work, non-work and stress related consequences that are evidenced in a complicated network of direct and indirect relationships. The results suggest that the consequences of work-family conflict may be best reduced by making attempts to prevent or eliminate a consequence that occurs early in the chain. A discussion of these and other implications are presented, and suggestions made for future research.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.relation.haspartESSON.pdfen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectJob Stressen_US
dc.subjectJob Satisfactionen_US
dc.subjectJob Performanceen_US
dc.subjectIntention to Quiten_US
dc.subjectWork-family Conflicten_US
dc.subjectBurnouten_US
dc.titleConsequences of Work-Family Conflict: Testing a New Model of Work-Related, Non-Work-Related and Sress-Related Outcomesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairDonovan, John J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHauenstein, Neil M. A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFoti, Roseanne J.en_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05122004-205454en_US
dc.date.sdate2004-05-12en_US
dc.date.rdate2006-06-10
dc.date.adate2004-06-10en_US


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