Islamic Imaginings: Depictions of Muslims in English-Language Children's Literature in the United States from 1990 to 2010

dc.contributor.authorWood, Garyen
dc.contributor.committeechairFuller, Theodore D.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBurge, Penny L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberHawdon, James E.en
dc.contributor.departmentSociologyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-13T19:43:57Zen
dc.date.adate2011-05-31en
dc.date.available2017-06-13T19:43:57Zen
dc.date.issued2011-04-27en
dc.date.rdate2016-01-26en
dc.date.sdate2011-05-10en
dc.description.abstractThis research examines changes in the depiction of Muslims in Islamic-themed children's literature over two time strata, one decade before and one decade after the events of September 11, 2001. Random sampling with replacement across the two strata yielded a total sample of 59 books, examined at three coding levels: bibliographic data, story/plot data (genre, rural/urban setting, time epoch, conflict type, conflict context, religious instruction), and primary character data (age, culture/ethnicity, and gender). Content is examined using both quantitative comparisons of manifest characteristics and qualitative comparison of emergent themes. Mann-Whitney U tests revealed no statistically significant changes regarding the quantities of manifest features, while additional qualitative analyses suggest six substantive latent thematic changes identified with respect to genre (3), time epoch/setting (1), conflict type (1), and gender related to conflict type (1). Regarding genre, while the quantity of books with humor, with Arabic glossary additions and those employing non-fiction are consistent, the kinds of humor, the nature of glossaria and the subject focus of non-fictions are believed to have changed. With respect to a story's setting, shifts are identified in the treatment of rural and urban spaces, even while most books continue to be set in rural locales. Finally, with respect to a story's conflict type and the primary characters engaged in that conflict, it is believed that changes are evident with respect to self-versus-self conflict type and that female characters are generally lacking in stories of self-identity discovery.en
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen
dc.identifier.otheretd-05102011-190831en
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05102011-190831/en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/78103en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subject9/11en
dc.subjectchildren's literatureen
dc.subjectIslamen
dc.subjectcontent analysisen
dc.subjectMuslimen
dc.titleIslamic Imaginings: Depictions of Muslims in English-Language Children's Literature in the United States from 1990 to 2010en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
etd-05102011-190831_Wood_GL_T_2011.pdf
Size:
901.86 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Collections