Reason, Imagination, and Universalism in C. S. Lewis

Files
etd.pdf (220.55 KB)
Downloads: 1524
TR Number
Date
2004-07-19
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Virginia Tech
Abstract

Though he is generally known as one of the key voices in conservative Christianity, this thesis demonstrates that C. S. Lewis was in fact far more liberal in his view of salvation than many would expect. Lewis argued for a universalist interpretation of salvation, in which the death of Christ opened up the possibility of salvation for all of humanity, not merely those people who could be identified as Christians. Lewis did believe that people could and did choose Hell over Heaven, however, and still saw evangelism as the duty of every Christian. All of Lewis's writings are in a sense evangelistic, and all attempt to effect the conversion of the reader in the same manner in which Lewis himself was first drawn to Christianity: by baptizing the imagination in the hope that the reason will follow.

Description
Keywords
C. S. Lewis, universalism, religion
Citation
Collections