A New Chromosomal Phylogeny Supports the Repeated Origin of Vectorial Capacity in Malaria Mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae Complex

dc.contributor.authorKamali, Maryamen
dc.contributor.authorXia, Aien
dc.contributor.authorTu, Zhijian Jakeen
dc.contributor.authorSharakhov, Igor V.en
dc.contributor.departmentBiochemistryen
dc.contributor.departmentEntomologyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-05T23:41:25Zen
dc.date.available2017-01-05T23:41:25Zen
dc.date.issued2012-10-01en
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding phylogenetic relationships within species complexes of disease vectors is crucial for identifying genomic changes associated with the evolution of epidemiologically important traits. However, the high degree of genetic similarity among sibling species confounds the ability to determine phylogenetic relationships using molecular markers. The goal of this study was to infer the ancestral–descendant relationships among malaria vectors and nonvectors of the Anopheles gambiae species complex by analyzing breakpoints of fixed chromosomal inversions in ingroup and several outgroup species. We identified genes at breakpoints of fixed overlapping chromosomal inversions 2Ro and 2Rp of An. merus using fluorescence in situ hybridization, a whole-genome mate-paired sequencing, and clone sequencing. We also mapped breakpoints of a chromosomal inversion 2La (common to An. merus, An. gambiae, and An. arabiensis) in outgroup species using a bioinformatics approach. We demonstrated that the ‘‘standard’’ 2R+p arrangement and ‘‘inverted’’ 2Ro and 2La arrangements are present in outgroup species Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus. The data indicate that the ancestral species of the An. gambiae complex had the 2Ro, 2R+p, and 2La chromosomal arrangements. The ‘‘inverted’’ 2Ro arrangement uniquely characterizes a malaria vector An. merus as the basal species in the complex. The rooted chromosomal phylogeny implies that An. merus acquired the 2Rp inversion and that its sister species An. gambiae acquired the 2R+o inversion from the ancestral species. The karyotype of nonvectors An. quadriannulatus A and B was derived from the karyotype of the major malaria vector An. gambiae. We conclude that the ability to effectively transmit human malaria had originated repeatedly in the complex. Our findings also suggest that saltwater tolerance originated first in An. merus and then independently in An. melas. The new chromosomal phylogeny will facilitate identifying the association of evolutionary genomic changes with epidemiologically important phenotypes.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, www.niaid.nih.gov, grants 1R21AI081023 and 1R21AI094289 to IVS. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.en
dc.description.versionPublished versionen
dc.format.extent? - ? (12) page(s)en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifier.citationKamali M, Xia A, Tu Z, Sharakhov IV (2012) A New Chromosomal Phylogeny Supports the Repeated Origin of Vectorial Capacity in Malaria Mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae Complex. PLoS Pathog 8(10): e1002960. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002960en
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1002960en
dc.identifier.issn1553-7374en
dc.identifier.issue10en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/73974en
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.plospathogens.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.ppat.100296en
dc.identifier.volume8en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPLOSen
dc.relation.urihttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000310530300023&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=930d57c9ac61a043676db62af60056c1en
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectmicrobiologyen
dc.subjectparasitologyen
dc.subjectvirologyen
dc.subjectinsecticide resistanceen
dc.subjectpopulation-geneticsen
dc.subjectmitochondrial-dnaen
dc.subjectgenome sequenceen
dc.subjectinversion 2laen
dc.subjectevolutionen
dc.subjectdrosophilaen
dc.subjecttransmissionen
dc.subjectdipteraen
dc.subjectintrogressionen
dc.subjectbacteriophagesen
dc.subjectchromosomesen
dc.subjectgenome evolutionen
dc.subjectgenomic library screeningen
dc.subjectinversionsen
dc.subjectmalariaen
dc.subjectmosquitoesen
dc.subjectphylogeneticsen
dc.titleA New Chromosomal Phylogeny Supports the Repeated Origin of Vectorial Capacity in Malaria Mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae Complexen
dc.title.serialPlos Pathogensen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Techen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/Biochemistryen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/CALS T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/Entomologyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Faculty of Health Sciencesen
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
A new chromosomal phylogeny supports the repeated origin of vectorial capacity in malaria mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae complex.pdf
Size:
1.11 MB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description:
Publisher's Version
License bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Name:
VTUL_Distribution_License_2016_05_09.pdf
Size:
18.09 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description: