Using Hyperspectral and Multispectral Indices to Detect Water Stress for an Urban Turfgrass System

dc.contributor.authorBadzmierowski, Mike J.en
dc.contributor.authorMcCall, David S.en
dc.contributor.authorEvanylo, Gregory K.en
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Plant and Environmental Sciencesen
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-09T12:26:47Zen
dc.date.available2019-08-09T12:26:47Zen
dc.date.issued2019-08-08en
dc.date.updated2019-08-09T08:02:01Zen
dc.description.abstractSpectral reflectance measurements collected from hyperspectral and multispectral radiometers have the potential to be a management tool for detecting water and nutrient stress in turfgrass. Hyperspectral radiometers collect hundreds of narrowband reflectance data compared to multispectral radiometers that collect three to ten broadband reflectance data for a cheaper cost. Spectral reflectance data have been used to create vegetation indices such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the simple ratio vegetation index (RVI) to assess crop growth, density, and fertility. Other indices such as the water band index (WBI) (narrowband index) and green-to-red ratio index (GRI) (both broadband and narrowband index) have been proposed to predict soil moisture status in turfgrass systems. The objective of this study was to compare the value of multispectral and hyperspectral radiometers to assess soil volumetric water content (VWC) and tall fescue (<i>Festuca arundinacea</i> Schreb.) responses. The multispectral radiometer VI had the strongest relationships to turfgrass quality, biomass, and tissue N accumulation during the trial period (April 2017&ndash;August 2018). Soil VWC had the strongest relationship to WBI (<i>r</i> = 0.60), followed by GRI and NDVI (both <i>r</i> = 0.54) for the 0% evapotranspiration (ET). Nonlinear regression showed strong relationships at high water stress periods in each year for WBI (<i>r</i> = 0.69&ndash;0.79), GRI (<i>r</i> = 0.64&ndash;0.75), and NDVI (<i>r</i> = 0.58&ndash;0.79). Broadband index data collected using a mobile multispectral sensor is a cheaper alternative to hyperspectral radiometry and can provide better spatial coverage.en
dc.description.versionPublished versionen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.identifier.citationBadzmierowski, M.J.; McCall, D.S.; Evanylo, G. Using Hyperspectral and Multispectral Indices to Detect Water Stress for an Urban Turfgrass System. Agronomy 2019, 9, 439.en
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9080439en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/93018en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjecttall fescueen
dc.subjectturfgrass managementen
dc.subjectvegetation indexen
dc.subjectNDVIen
dc.subjectdrought stressen
dc.subjectsoil volumetric water contenten
dc.subjectnitrogen availabilityen
dc.titleUsing Hyperspectral and Multispectral Indices to Detect Water Stress for an Urban Turfgrass Systemen
dc.title.serialAgronomyen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
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