Native Sovereignty, Narrative Argument, and an International Shift: The 1974 Rhetoric of George Manuel and Vine Deloria, Jr.

Files

Thesis.pdf (727.43 KB)
Downloads: 1041

TR Number

Date

2004-07-08

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Virginia Tech

Abstract

The modern era of globalization presents a situation where indigenous cultures are potentially being eroded away. As a result, leaders of these groups need to begin using effective rhetorical strategies in their efforts to defend their worldview against the dominating views of Western ideology. This thesis attempts to present a case study analysis of the work of two leaders in the Native American rights movement: George Manuel and Vine Deloria, Jr. Manuel'­s book The Fourth World: An Indian Reality and Deloria's Behind the Trail of Broken Treaties: An Indian Declaration of Independence are presented as examples for how modern indigenous leaders can use narrative argument, addressing the persuasive functions of social movements, to foster political action on a people-to-people, national, and transnational level.

Description

Keywords

George Manuel, Native Sovereignty, Narrative Theory, Vine Deloria, Jr.

Citation

Collections