The Predictive Accuracy of Conscientiousness when Responses are Dissimulated: Does Self-Consistency Matter?

dc.contributor.authorChang, Wan-Yinen
dc.contributor.committeechairHauenstein, Neil M. A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberDonovan, John J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberFoti, Roseanne J.en
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-06T16:01:39Zen
dc.date.adate2004-06-10en
dc.date.available2011-08-06T16:01:39Zen
dc.date.issued2004-05-03en
dc.date.rdate2006-06-10en
dc.date.sdate2004-05-12en
dc.description.abstractThe present study used a laboratory setting to explore the criterion-related validity of non-cognitive measures as related to personnel selection. The focal study investigated psychological processes resulting from situational causes of motivation to distort item responses. In particular, I investigated whether differences in the motivation to distort item responses interacted with self-consistency in the prediction of performance on a clerical task. Findings suggested that despite range restriction and the existence of faking behavior, a positive correlation between conscientiousness and performance exists. Variation of selection ratio (SR) and monetary incentives successfully produced faking behaviors, and the existence of faking behaviors was found in selection setting. Results partially supported the proposed hypothesis that there are positive and negative effects of faking behaviors. Implications of the present study were further discussed.en
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.identifier.otheretd-05122004-153525en
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05122004-153525en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/9960en
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.relation.haspartthesis.pdfen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectfakingen
dc.subjectPerformanceen
dc.subjectIPIPen
dc.subjectpreference for consistencyen
dc.titleThe Predictive Accuracy of Conscientiousness when Responses are Dissimulated: Does Self-Consistency Matter?en
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
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