Detection of a Surrogate Biological Threat Agent (Bacillus globigii) with a Portable Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

dc.contributor.authorAdducci, Benjamin Augustusen
dc.contributor.committeechairSchmale, David G. IIIen
dc.contributor.committeememberVinatzer, Boris A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBarney, Jacoben
dc.contributor.departmentPlant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Scienceen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-30T07:00:13Zen
dc.date.available2016-11-30T07:00:13Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06-08en
dc.description.abstractNew methods and technology are needed to detect biological agents that threaten the health of humans and domestic animals. The bacterium Bacillus anthracis, causal agent of anthrax, has been used as a biological warfare agent. Here, we extend the work of Chinowksy et al. (2007) to the detection of a surrogate of B. anthracis, B. globigii (also known as B. atrophaeus, B. subtilis var. niger, B. subtilis var. subtilis) in a mixed sample containing two different species of Bacillus using a portable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor (SPIRIT 4.0, Seattle Sensor Systems). Two methods (direct capture and antibody injection) were used to determine the limit of detection for spores of B. globigii and to detect spores of B. globigii in a mixed sample containing at least one other Bacillus spp. Spores of B. globigii were detected on freshly coated sensors (not previously exposed to spores) with direct capture at a minimum concentration of 10^7 spores/mL, and with antibody injection at a concentration of 10^5 spores/mL. Spores of B. globigii were also detected when mixed with B. pumilus spores in the same sample at equal concentrations (107 spores/mL) using antibody injection. An SPR method using synthetic miRNA was adapted to the portable SPR unit (SPIRIT), and preliminary experiments suggested that the target sequence could be detected. SPR methods using nucleic acids have an exciting future in the detection of biological agents, such as B. anthracis. With the availability of portable instrumentation to accurately detect biological warfare agents such as B. anthracis, emergency responders can implement emergency protocols in a timely fashion, limiting the amount of people and domestic animals exposed.en
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:5235en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/73535en
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectanthraxen
dc.subjectBacillus anthracisen
dc.subjectbacteriaen
dc.subjectbiosecurityen
dc.subjectbiosensoren
dc.subjectdetectionen
dc.subjectpathogenen
dc.subjectSPRen
dc.subjectpathogenen
dc.subjectsporeen
dc.subjectSPRen
dc.titleDetection of a Surrogate Biological Threat Agent (Bacillus globigii) with a Portable Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensoren
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
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