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dc.contributor.authorSpies, Lucas Danielen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-11T08:01:14Z
dc.date.available2019-07-11T08:01:14Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-10
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:21341en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/91407
dc.description.abstractTire-Pavement Interaction Noise (TPIN) becomes the main noise source contributor for passenger vehicles traveling at speeds above 40 kph. Therefore, it represents one of the main contributors to noise environmental pollution in residential areas nearby highways. TPIN has been subject of exhaustive studies since the 1970s. Still, almost 50 years later, there is still not an accurate way to model it. This is a consequence of a large number of noise generation mechanisms involved in this phenomenon, and their high complexity nature. It is acknowledged that the main noise mechanisms involve tire vibration, and air pumping within the tire tread and pavement surface. Moreover, TPIN represents the only vehicle noise source strongly affected by an external factor such as pavement roughness. For the last decade, new machine learning algorithms to model TPIN have been implemented. However, their development relay on experimental data, and do not provide strong physical insight into the problem. This research studied the correct configuration of such tools. More specifically, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) configurations were studied. Their implementation was based on the problem requirements (acoustic sound pressure prediction). Moreover, a customized neuron configuration showed improvements on the ANN TPIN prediction capabilities. During the second stage of this thesis, tire noise test was undertaken for different tires at different pavements surfaces on the Virginia Tech SMART road. The experimental data was used to develop an approach to account for the pavement profile when predicting TPIN. Finally, the new ANN configuration, along with the approach to account for pavement roughness were complemented using previous work to obtain what is the first reasonable accurate and complete tool to predict tire noise. This tool uses as inputs: 1) tire parameters, 2) pavement parameters, and 3) vehicle speed. Tire noise narrowband spectra for a frequency range of 400-1600 Hz is obtained as a result.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectTire noiseen_US
dc.subjectTire-Pavement interaction noiseen_US
dc.subjectArtificial Neural Networken_US
dc.titleMachine-Learning based tool to predict Tire Noise using both Tire and Pavement Parametersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairBurdisso, Ricardo A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTarazaga, Pablo Albertoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSandu, Corinaen_US
dc.description.abstractgeneralTire-Pavement Interaction Noise (TPIN) becomes the main noise source contributor for passenger vehicles traveling at speeds above 40 kph. Therefore, it represents one of the main contributors to noise environmental pollution in residential areas nearby highways. TPIN has been subject of exhaustive studies since the 1970s. Still, almost 50 years later, there is still not an accurate way to model it. This is a consequence of a large number of noise generation mechanisms involved in this phenomenon, and their high complexity nature. It is acknowledged that the main noise mechanisms involve tire vibration, and air pumping within the tire tread and pavement surface. Moreover, TPIN represents the only vehicle noise source strongly affected by an external factor such as pavement roughness. For the last decade, machine learning algorithms, based on the human brain structure, have been implemented to model TPIN. However, their development relay on experimental data, and do not provide strong physical insight into the problem. This research focused on the study of the correct configuration of such machine learning algorithms applied to the very specific task of TPIN prediction. Moreover, a customized configuration showed improvements on the TPIN prediction capabilities of these algorithms. During the second stage of this thesis, tire noise test was undertaken for different tires at different pavements surfaces on the Virginia Tech SMART road. The experimental data was used to develop an approach to account for the pavement roughness when predicting TPIN. Finally, the new machine learning algorithm configuration, along with the approach to account for pavement roughness were complemented using previous work to obtain what is the first reasonable accurate and complete computational tool to predict tire noise. This tool uses as inputs: 1) tire parameters, 2) pavement parameters, and 3) vehicle speed.en


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