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dc.contributor.authorTimoshevskiy, Vladimir A.en
dc.contributor.authorKinney, Nicholas A.en
dc.contributor.authordeBruyn, Becky S.en
dc.contributor.authorMao, Chunhongen
dc.contributor.authorTu, Zhijian Jakeen
dc.contributor.authorSeverson, D. W.en
dc.contributor.authorSharakhov, Igor V.en
dc.contributor.authorSharakhova, Maria V.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-05T23:43:40Zen
dc.date.available2017-01-05T23:43:40Zen
dc.date.issued2014-04-14en
dc.identifier.citationBMC Biology. 2014 Apr 14;12(1):27en
dc.identifier.issn1741-7007en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/73980en
dc.description.abstractBackground An initial comparative genomic study of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae and the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti revealed striking differences in the genome assembly size and in the abundance of transposable elements between the two species. However, the chromosome arms homology between An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti, as well as the distribution of genes and repetitive elements in chromosomes of Ae. aegypti, remained largely unexplored because of the lack of a detailed physical genome map for the yellow fever mosquito. Results Using a molecular landmark-guided fluorescent in situ hybridization approach, we mapped 624-Mb of the Ae. aegypti genome to mitotic chromosomes. We used this map to analyze the distribution of genes, tandem repeats and transposable elements along the chromosomes and to explore the patterns of chromosome homology and rearrangements between Ae. aegypti and An. gambiae. The study demonstrated that the q arm of the sex-determining chromosome 1 had the lowest gene content and the highest density of minisatellites. A comparative genomic analysis with An. gambiae determined that the previously proposed whole-arm synteny is not fully preserved; a number of pericentric inversions have occurred between the two species. The sex-determining chromosome 1 had a higher rate of genome rearrangements than observed in autosomes 2 and 3 of Ae. aegypti. Conclusions The study developed a physical map of 45% of the Ae. aegypti genome and provided new insights into genomic composition and evolution of Ae. aegypti chromosomes. Our data suggest that minisatellites rather than transposable elements played a major role in rapid evolution of chromosome 1 in the Aedes lineage. The research tools and information generated by this study contribute to a more complete understanding of the genome organization and evolution in mosquitoes.en
dc.format.extent? - ? (13) page(s)en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherBiomed Central Ltden
dc.relation.urihttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000335407000001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=930d57c9ac61a043676db62af60056c1en
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectBiologyen
dc.subjectLife Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topicsen
dc.subjectBIOLOGYen
dc.subjectPhysical mappingen
dc.subjectMosquitoen
dc.subjectGenomeen
dc.subjectChromosomeen
dc.subjectYELLOW-FEVER MOSQUITOen
dc.subjectQUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCIen
dc.subjectDROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER HETEROCHROMATINen
dc.subjectMALARIA PARASITE SUSCEPTIBILITYen
dc.subjectANOPHELES-GAMBIAEen
dc.subjectTRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTen
dc.subjectPOLYTENE CHROMOSOMESen
dc.subjectLINKAGE MAPen
dc.subjectSEQUENCEen
dc.subjectDIPTERAen
dc.titleGenomic composition and evolution of Aedes aegypti chromosomes revealed by the analysis of physically mapped supercontigsen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.description.versionPublished versionen
dc.rights.holderVladimir A Timoshevskiy et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en
dc.contributor.departmentBiochemistryen
dc.contributor.departmentEntomologyen
dc.contributor.departmentFralin Life Sciences Instituteen
dc.title.serialBMC BIOLOGYen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/1741-7007-12-27en
dc.identifier.volume12en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Techen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/Biochemistryen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/CALS T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/Entomologyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Faculty of Health Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes/Biocomplexity Instituteen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes/Biocomplexity Institute/Researchersen


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International