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dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorJensen, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorPogorelcnik, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorXing, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrasset, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorVaury, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorSharakhov, IVen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-04T23:18:40Z
dc.date.available2017-01-04T23:18:40Z
dc.date.issued2015-11-27en_US
dc.identifier.issn1756-8935en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/73947
dc.description.abstractBackground Specific genomic loci, termed Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) clusters, manufacture piRNAs that serve as guides for the inactivation of complementary transposable elements (TEs). The piRNA pathway has been accurately detailed in Drosophila melanogaster, while it remains poorly examined in other insects. This pathway is increasingly recognized as critical for germline development and reproduction. Understanding of the piRNA functions in mosquitoes could offer an opportunity for disease vector control by the reduction of their reproductive potential. Results To analyze the similarities and differences in this pathway between Drosophila and mosquito, we performed an in-depth analysis of the genomic loci producing piRNAs and their targets in the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. We identified 187 piRNA clusters in the An. gambiae genome and 155 piRNA clusters in the D. melanogaster genome. We demonstrate that many more piRNA clusters in the mosquito compared with the fruit fly are uni-directionally transcribed and are located outside pericentromeric heterochromatin. About 11 % of the An. gambiae piRNA population map to gene transcripts. This is a noticeable increase compared with the ~6 % of the piRNA population mapped to genes in D. melanogaster. A subset of the piRNA-enriched genes in An. gambiae has functions related to reproduction and development. At least 24 and 65 % of the mapped piRNAs correspond to genomic TE sequences in An. gambiae and D. melanogaster, respectively. DNA transposons and non-LTR retrotransposons are more abundant in An. gambiae, while LTR retrotransposons are more abundant in D. melanogaster. Yet, piRNAs predominantly target LTR retrotransposons in both species, which may point to a distinct feature of these elements compared to the other classes of TEs concerning their silencing by the piRNA pathway. Conclusions Here, we demonstrate that piRNA-producing loci have more ubiquitous distribution in the An. gambiae genome than in the genome of D. melanogaster. Also, protein-coding genes have an increased role in production of piRNAs in the germline of this mosquito. Genes involved in germline and embryonic development of An. gambiae generate a substantial portion of piRNAs, suggesting a role of the piRNA pathway in the epigenetic regulation of the reproductive processes in the African malaria vector.en_US
dc.format.extent? - ? (20) page(s)en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBiomed Central Ltden_US
dc.relation.urihttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000365564500001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=930d57c9ac61a043676db62af60056c1en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectGenetics & Heredityen_US
dc.subjectAnopheles gambiaeen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmenten_US
dc.subjectDrosophila melanogasteren_US
dc.subjectEuchromatinen_US
dc.subjectGermlineen_US
dc.subjectHeterochromatinen_US
dc.subjectpiRNA clustersen_US
dc.subjectReproductionen_US
dc.subjectSmall RNAsen_US
dc.subjectTransposable elementen_US
dc.subjectGERMLINE STEM-CELLSen_US
dc.subjectOSKAR MESSENGER-RNAen_US
dc.subjectAEDES-AEGYPTIen_US
dc.subjectHETEROCHROMATIN FORMATIONen_US
dc.subjectTRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTSen_US
dc.subjectTRAFFIC-JAMen_US
dc.subjectBOMBYX-MORIen_US
dc.subjectGENOMEen_US
dc.subjectPIWIen_US
dc.subjectVECTORen_US
dc.titleIncreased production of piRNAs from euchromatic clusters and genes in Anopheles gambiae compared with Drosophila melanogasteren_US
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden_US
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewed
dc.description.versionPublished (Publication status)en_US
dc.title.serialEpigenetics & Chromatin
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s13072-015-0041-5
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/CALS T&R Faculty
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/Entomology
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Faculty
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Faculty of Health Sciences


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International